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covering history as it happens. live from our nation's capital. this is "washington week" with gwen ifill, produced in association with national journal. corporate fuppeding for "washington week" is provided by -- -- corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern, one line, infinite possibilities. >> we know why we're here, to chart a greern path in the air and in our factories. >> to find cleaner, more efficient ways to power flight. >> and harn es -- harness our technology for new energy solutions. >> the people of boeing are looking to tomorrow to build a better tomorrow. >> that's why we're here. >> additional corporate funding is provided by -- prudential financial. additional funding is provided by the annenburg foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. once again live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. 2012 was a remarkable year one that was shaped by other exploration of america's essent
and analysis, covering history as it happens, live from our nation's capitol, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill, produced in association with "national journal." corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> this rock has never stood still. since 1875 we've been there for our clients through good times and bad. when their needs changed we were there to meet them. through the years from insurance to investment management, from real estate to retirement solutions, we've developed new ideas for the financial challenges ahead. this rock has never stood still, and that's one thing that will never change. prudential. >> wherever our trades negotiation the economy comes to life. norfolk-suffolk, one line, infinite possibilities. >> additional corporate funding is provided by boeing. additional funding is provided by the anenburg foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. once again, live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. perhaps you took a break for the holidays.
. it is this issue, spending. >> this week on "inside washington," more fiscal cliff notes. susan rice takes her name off the board. >> i did not want to see a confirmation process that was very prolonged, very politicized, very distracting, very destructive. >> what do you think will happen to assad? >> killed. >> michigan, the home of the united auto workers, now a right to work state. >> and they have been guarding the governor's office all day. >> the supreme court will tackle a marria -- gay marriage. >> it is about time. captioned by the national captioning institute >> if we make it through december, everything will be all right. i would sing that for you, but i don't wish to offend merle haggard. feels like the coldest time of winter on capitol hill. >> there has not been any progress. >> the president and his allies have taken so many things off the table the only thing left is varnish. >> charles, are we going off the cliff? >> look, it is almost impossible to predict. the republicans are in such disarray that they may take on december 30. if they don'
and violence. in washington, the woman who will not be secretary of state. >> i withdrew my name because i think it's the right thing for the country, and i think it's the right thing for the president. gwen: how politics derailed u.n. ambassador susan rice, even as at least one critical foreign policy matter heats up, syria. >> i think the regime in damascus is approaching collapse. gwen: on the domestic front, the slow march towards the fiscal cliff continues. >> i'm pretty confident that republicans would not hold middle class taxes hostage. >> it's clear the president is just not serious about cutting spending. >> covering the week, reid wilson of "the hotline," david sanger of "the new york times," martha raddatz of abc news, and john dickerson of "slate" magazine and cbs news. >> award-winning reporting and analysis, covering history as it happens. live from our nation's capital, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill, produced in association with "national journal." corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> we know why we're here. to chart a greener path in the
to the president about it. congresswoman kathy mcmorris rogers of washington state is the party's conference chair in the house. >> we're going to either succeed together or we're going to fail together. the president is calling for higher taxes as well as more spending. he's calling for another stimulus. at a time when we need tax reform. we need to be looking at... and the republicans have put forward tax reform that includes closing the loopholes, eliminating some of those tax credits, that will actually impact the wealthiest. >> reporter: some republicans said the boehner plan goes too far in taxing the well-off. south carolina senator jim demint, a staunch fiscal conservative, blasted the plan on twitter today. he said speaker boehner's offer of an $800 billion tax hike will destroy jobs and allow politicians in washington to spend even more. but the senate's democratic majority leader harry reid warned republicans against listening to such voices. >> you can't let these negotiations be dictated by the tea party. our guiding principle should be the views of the vast majority of the american p
. >> reporter: the house will vote on the republican plan b tomorrow. veterans of washington's budget battles wouldn't be surprised to see a plan c or d before a final resolution is hammered out. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. >> susie: the threat of the fiscal cliff was a big topic at an investor conference in new york today hosted by johnson controls. this wisconsin-based industrial conglomerate is a leading provider of products to make buildings energy efficient, and it's also the world's largest maker of car batteries and automotive seats. c.e.o. stephen roell told me he's worried that uncertainty about the fiscal cliff could hurt consumer confidence, and his business. >> we don't do that. as the consumer, i products to costumers like the big three, that in turn sell to the auto industry. my biggest concern is how it will affect the psychology of the consumer. i've been surprised, susie, that people continue to buy automobiles. but my fear is that could change dramatically. >> susie: steve, to what extent are the ups and downs impacting your business day to day. >> i think people ar
rose. . >> rose: we're in washington where fiscal cliff negotiations continue. as we taped this program it is 5:30 p.m. the house of representatives is expected to vote on the republican plan b later it this evening. house majority leader eric cantor urged democrats to support the bill which extends the bush tax cuts on income over 1 million. >> we house republicans are taking concrete actions to avoid the fiscal cliff. absent a balanced offer from the president, this is our nation's best option. and senate democrats should take up both of these measures immediately. and the president has a decision to make. he can support these measures or be responsible for reckless spending and the largest tax hike in american history. >> rose: the white house has pledged to veto plan b as 2012 comes to a close it remains to be seen whether law lakers will rise above partisanship or avert fiscal crisis. joining me al hunt and july yana goldman. we want to talk about the fiscal cliff. we want to talk about white house appointments. we want to talk about gun control and we want to talk about hearings o
: kwame holman updates washington's spending and tax stalemate after house republicans decide not to follow the leader. >> brown: and mark shields and michael gerson analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the remaking of the obama administration's foreign policy team began today as the president nominated massachusetts senator john kerry to replace hilary clinton as secretary of state. the former presidential candidate who lost to george w. bush in 2004 got the nod after u.n. ambassador susan rice withdr
up with. statements from the founding fathers about our guns. toward washington. -- george washington. try to stop gun sales in this country, you will run into a series of roadblocks. >> australia had a mass killing in the mid-1990s and they passed a severe loss where all existing guns had to be turned in. the government bought them back. after a certain date if they were in your home, you were arrested. they have had a decrease in crime and suicide, which is an interesting development. it seems to me, you either have to go that route, which you cannot in the u.s. -- gun ownership in australia was 5% of households. gallup has shown is 47% here. we have the second amendment and the history back to washington. given that we are a different culture, the kinds of laws that we pass are almost always an effective as a result, because there are 300 million weapons out there today. unless you recall them the way that australia did, and we cannot do that -- you would have a reservoir that would last 100 years. >> you can imagine what would happen. there would be an insurrection. >> you do not
. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: washington's clock ticked another day closer today to automatic tax hikes and spending cuts, the so-called "fiscal cliff". the president took to the road, while republicans warned there's a deadlock in efforts to reach a deficit deal. >> now, of course, santa delivers everywhere. i've been keeping my own naughty and nice lists for washington. >> warner: the president chose a seasonal setting, a toy factory in hatfield, pennsylvania, and holiday imagery to press again for extending tax cuts for the middle class. >> if congress does nothing, every family in america will see their income taxes automatically go up on january 1. i mean, i... i'm assuming that doesn't sound too good to you. >> no. >> that's sort of like the lump of coal you get for christmas. that's a scrooge christmas. >> warner: in washington, republicans portrayed the road trip as so much humbug, at a time, they said, when negotiations are going nowhere. >> there's a stalemate. let's not kid ourselves. >> warner: house speaker john boehner said republica
. >> thank you. >> you've no doubt been following the maneuvers in washington over the country's finances. well, they're heading now toward a showdown. unless someone blinks, the collision of irresistible forces with immovable objects will be felt around the world. president obama says he won't budge when it comes to ending the bush tax cuts for the wealthy. and as rumors mount that some republicans may be willing to give ground on taxes, conservatives in the party are shouting, "remember the alamo!" and demanding their leaders in congress yield not an inch. dozens of conservative activists, outraged at the prospect of compromise, have sent an open letter to republicans in the house and senate "to stand firm and not surrender your conservative principles." their hero, of course, is this man, known around town simply as grover. no, not the muppet, but chief enforcer of the notorious norquist pledge against taxes. republican candidates for office must sign or risk defeat by right-wing candidates in primaries where a turnout of die-hard partisans can decide the outcome. among republican poli
charges, but no agreement in sight. that, in short, summed up the state of affairs in washington today as the fiscal cliff deadline loomed, january first. it would mean more than $600 billion in across-the-board tax increases and automatic spending cuts. >> come the first of this year, americans will have less income than they have today. if we go over the cliff, and it looks like that's where we're headed. >> warner: this morning, the senate's democratic majority leader, harry reid, was blunt about chances for a deal. and he blamed house speaker john boehner. just before christmas, boehner floated his so-called "plan b"-- letting taxes rise on millionaires. but faced with opposition in republican ranks, he pulled it, and sent the house home for the holiday. reid charged today politics explained why the speaker had not yet called the house back. >> john boehner seems to care more about keeping his speakership than keeping the nation on a firm financial footing. it's obvious what's going on. he's waiting until january 3 to get reelected to speaker before he gets serious about negotiatio
solman begins our coverage. >> reporter: washington brightened yesterday when the annual switch was flipped; the white house christmas tree, relit. and this morning, more holiday cheer, it seemed, in the form of the monthly jobs numbers. 146,000 new jobs were created last month, according to the survey of employers; unemployment dropped again, to 7.7%, according to the survey of households. both numbers better than expected in the wake of hurricane sandy and fiscal cliff anxiety. >> so it looks like sandy will not affect the numbers even after revisions. >> reporter: georgetown's harry holzer, former chief economist for the labor department. >> in terms of the fiscal cliff, so far we are not seeing any big impact. >> reporter: not even an impact on retail which, for all the talk of online supplanting bricks-and-mortar buying, added 53,000 jobs last month-- much of it holiday hiring, no doubt-- but a healthy 140,000 overall increase in the past three months. not all the new numbers were festive, however. construction shed 20,000 jobs, though perhaps influenced by sandy. manufactu
in washington the debate is returning to the always thorny issue of gun control. members of congress are starting to be heard on gun law, heeding the president's call to act to prevent another atrocity. as he had on friday, the president pressed for change last night regardless he said of the politics. >> in the coming weeks i'll use whatever power this office holds to engage my fellow citizens from law enforcement to mental health professionals to parents and educators in an effort aimed at preventing more tragedies like this. >> suarez: today at the capitol, there were early signs of a possible break in the long dead lock on gun control. on ms-nbc west virginia senator joe said newtown has changed the conversation. >> i ask all my friends in the n.r.a. -- and i'm a proud n.r.a. member and always have been -- that we need to sit down and move this dialogue a sensible, reasonable approach to fixing it. it's part of it, not all of it. everything has to be on the table and i think it will be >> suarez: this afternoon the senate opened with a moment of silence for the newtown victims. t
falling as concern mounts that washington will fail to get a budget deal. the dow jones industrial average lost 158 points today, to close at 12,938. the nasdaq fell 25 points to close at 2,960. for the week, both the dow and the nasdaq fell 2%. sectarian tensions flared across iraq today as tens of thousands of sunnis staged mass protests against the shi-ite-led government. there were rallies in fallujah and ramadi, where protests already had erupted earlier this week. today, mosul, tikrit and samarra had demonstrations as well. protesters took to the streets waving flags and signs. they chanted slogans demanding fair treatment from the baghdad regime, and the release of sunni prisoners. shi-ite prime minister nouri al-maliki said the demonstrations were not acceptable. the government of china imposed tighter controls on internet usage today. now, china's 500 million web users will have to provide their real names when they register for internet service. and providers must delete any web content deemed illegal, and report it to authorities. leading writers and bloggers insisted it's a ne
for talks, adding ohio has both cell phone service and airports. darren gersh, nbr, washington >> susie: that stalemate over the fiscal cliff weighed on the markets today, despite some encouraging reports on the economy. investors shrugged off news that initial jobless claims fell more than expected during the latest week, retail sales bounced back in november, and wholesale prices declined last month. by the close, the dow tumbled 75 points, the nasdaq fell 22 and the s&p was off nine points. despite that pessimism, many investment managers and analysts are feeling optimistic about 2013. a new investor survey says the u.s. stock market will be the best performing stock market in the world. for details, john rogers joins us. he's c.e.o. of the cfa institute that conducted the survey. so john, the u.s. stock market ranked as the best performer. if we look at the charge of coming in in second place, china and brazil. why the vote of confidence considering all these concerns about the fiscal cliff? >> you're right, susie. it's interesting. it's a happy holiday season for investors. in the
for a new congress to put the pieces back together in the new year. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. >> susie: well, roger altman is confident democrats and republicans will strike a deal and avoid falling off the fiscal cliff. he was deputy treasury secretary in the clinton administration and is now executive chairman and founder of evercore partners. >> susie: roger, so great to have you back on "nightly business report." >> thank you, susie. >> susie: nice to see you. why are you so optmistic there is going to be a fiscal cliff deal? >> i would cite two broad reasons, and then a few reasons specific to the negotiations. first on the broadside, the financial markets, as we've all seen over the past seven to nine days, especially the equity markets, have been rallying strongly in anticipation of an agreement. they're looking right past the fiscal cliff towards improved economic growth in 2013 and 2014. of course, they can be wrong, but on something of this magnitude, they rarely are wrong. second, i think the cost of failure, for both sides, the president and the democrats, and, of
foray outside washington today, trying to build public support for a fiscal cliff agreement. it came a day after he resumed talking with the top house republican, and as a year-end deadline moved even closer. the president took his public campaign for a deficit deal on his terms to the daimler diesel plant in redford michigan. >> if congress doesn't act soon meaning in the next few weeks, starting on january 1, everybody is going to see their income taxes go up. it's true. y'all don't like that? >> no! woodruff: instead, mr. obama again pressed for raising tax rates on the top two percent of incomes. >> and that's a principle i won't compromise on because i'm not going to have a situation where the wealthiest among us, including folks like me, get to keep all our tax breaks and then we're asking students to pay higher student loans. >> woodruff: his michigan visit came a day after the president and house speaker john boehner met privately at the white house. their first one-on-one session since the election. neither side gave any details about what was discussed. instead they issued
in newtown, connecticut. while in washington, president obama walked into the white house briefing room named for james brady-- the press secretary critically wounded in the shooting of president reagan in 1981-- to talk about gun violence. >> the fact that this problem is complex can no longer be an excuse for doing nothing. >> ifill: instead, in the wake of the massacre at sandy hook elementary school, mr. obama said, "this time, the words need to lead to action" on gun violence. >> the vast majority of responsible law abiding gun owners would be some of the first to say that we should be able to keep an irresponsible law breaking few from buying a weapon of war. i'm willing to bet that they don't think that using a gun and using common sense are incompatible ideas. there is a big chunk of space between what the 2nd amendment means and having no rules at all. >> reporter: to that end, the president announced vice president biden and an administration team will craft recommendations on everything from gun laws to mental health, to be sent to congress by january. >> this is not some washingt
: but the only real certainty appeared to be that lawmakers will be back in washington right after christmas if there's to be any deal before the new year's deadline. and to two reporters who've been closely watching this story. todd zwillich covers congress for public radio international's "the takeaway" on wnyc. and carol lee of the "wall street journal" joins us from the white house. thank you both for talking to us. carol, i'm going to start with you. from the white house perspective, where do things stand? >> i think from the white house perspective, the ball is essentially in the house john boehner's court. i think the president and his team of advisors feel that they've positioned him fairly well, that he's in a very defense i believe position in terms of his latest offer, that he forward yesterday. to the speaker. but if you step back and think about where we were four days ago versus where we are now, it's pretty remarkable how much the two sides have come to very close to reaching an actual deal. now the two sides are in this position where the job is to sell it to their different
president and also getting representatives and senators elected to washington. i think they took their eye off the ball to some extent in these local races. well now we see what happens when you don't have the feet on the ground, the money in the local races, you end up with state legislatures that are unfriendly to labor causes. so i think the wake-up call for labor nationally to focus on some of these states. i'm thinking about ohio now. ohio passed and then repealed a limit on collective bargaining for public employees but it doesn't mean that the issue won't come up there again. states like pennsylvania are not right to work states. there are still opportunities for the conservative movement, the antilabor movement, to go in for right to work. i think someone maybe in the labor movement will say, okay, we draw a land in the sand with michigan. we can't let this spread any further because there's clearly a domino effect. >> woodruff: what about that, bill? how do you see this in the grand scheme of the face-off that continues now between organized labor and those who believe it's what o
joining us from the capitol with the very latest is todd zwillich. he's washington correspondent for "the takeaway" on public radio international and a regular guest on the newshour. so todd, you're back with us again. six hours to go until midnight. progress reported but still to deal. >> senate republicans, judy, the latest thing that has happened is senate republicans came out of a conference meeting with their leader, with mitch mcconnell all sounding positive. they all echoed what you had in the piece there from mcconnell saying they were very, very close to sequester the automatic spending cuts remain an outstanding issue. and kind of got thrown into the mix again today. you know, the president in that appearance in the executive office building today in front of a supportive crowd, not really a press conference, more of like a minirally, talked about the sequester and his desire to have any delay in the sequester paid for with revenue increases. you know, i talked to a few house members just a few moments ago. not only ot tone of the president's presentation, but also that demand w
everyone is warning about is to be avoided. >> if they got to agreement the way washington is too quickly, their own side would just kill 'em because they wouldn't think they had negotiated hard enough. you know, they've got to go through this exchange. this is no different than when, you know, you list your house, you know, you put up one price, somebody comes in with a lower price, you kind of reach a middle ground. the thing i'm sure of is that we got to end up with at least $4 trillion of deficit reduction. some of that's got to come from revenues. i guarantee you the white house isn't going to do a deal unless it has an increase in tax rates for part of that revenue. i'm assuming that the republicans are going to insist that there be more cuts on the health care entitlements than what's been put on the table to date. >> ifill: here's the difference between what we're seeing now and what happens when i put my house on the market. at the end of this year there will be consequences. it's unclear... in the past when these consequences or these deadlines have arisen they've just put them
washington, you know what they do like? they like barack obama because they sense something about him that he's not a part of it. so even that first debate there we thought was a debacle, a lot of us people thought "well, i liked that because he's not playing that game, he's not playing gotcha, he's not saying nasty things." that that helped the balance for him. >> rose: i'll tell you who didn't like it, his campaign staff. >> i asked, -- at the end of the interview i said to him i ran into somebody during the course of the campaign who useded to work for you who is now the mayor of a major american city. >> rose: could it be chicago? (laughs) >> and i said to him "what happened, rahm, in that first debate?" and rahm looked at me and said "he had a hawaii moment." and when i said that the president laughed very loudly and he caught himself back and he told this lovely story there meant meant that when things seemed to be going to hell in a hand basket he and rahm would sit in the oval office and think "what wild we rather be doing?" and obama said "we'd rather that v a t-shirt shop in hawaii
what is going on in washington now between the president and the speaker, but if we -- if they fail completely and we go over this fiscal cliff what are the repercussions? you know, i mean, there is really a fair chance that they don't come to an agreement for whatever reason the house republicans won't support it and we go into 2013. i don't think that, per say, would be the end of the world because i think there would be a cry and it would get rein reined in after a few weeks and settle on this .. i would view this as a skirmish in a bigger war where you are growing entitlements, government services are getting more expensive. people are going to pay more and get less, and i think it is a very, very difficult tension of how to deal with that and this is just a first stage of that or one of many stages. so i don't think they are going to settle everything. i do hope they come to an agreement. i certainly hope we don't see another debt ceiling fiasco having the u.s. default on its debt, even technically would be pretty ugly. >> rose: what would be a reasonable agreement in your eyes
Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)